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Here’s Why You Should Try FitJoy Protein Bars


They’re not your average on-the-go snacks

FitJoy bars are different from competitors because they use two natural, zero-calorie sweeteners: stevia and monk fruit.

As the healthy eating editor, I try a lot of different protein bars, many of which fail to standout. The FitJoy package was straightforward: GMO-free, gluten-free, 20 grams of protein, and no artificial colors, flavors, or sweeteners.

FitJoy bars are different from competitors because they use two natural, zero-calorie sweeteners: stevia and monk fruit. By avoiding artificial sweeteners, the bars don’t have that chemical aftertaste that is common in diet sodas and other low-sugar products. The bars come in a variety of flavors such as chocolate chip cookie dough, mint chocolate crisp, chocolate peanut butter, frosted cinnamon roll, chocolate iced brownie, and French vanilla almond. I had the opportunity to try a couple, and noticed that each possessed its own unique texture and taste. FitJoy protein bars really can replace a meal, because besides the 20 grams of protein, the bar also provides up to 50 percent of the recommended daily intake of dietary fiber, allowing you to avoid between-meal snacks. Each bar is a little more than 200 calories with 4 grams of sugar, but that’s a small price to pay for all that protein and fiber.

FitJoy is the newest creation from its parent company, Nutrabolt, a nutritional life science company with products for the everyday athlete that help burn fat, boost muscle, and improve sexual endurance. FitJoy protein bars were an invention born out of necessity. Nutrabolt CEO Doss Cunningham always had a severe sensitivity to artificial sweeteners, and after he was diagnosed with celiac disease three years ago, he wanted to create a protein bar to for people with similar dietary restrictions. If you’re sensitive to gluten, or just want to change up your snack routine, try out a FitJoy. They are available to purchase in vitamin stores and online at fitjoynutrition.com.


Here&rsquos how much protein you should be eating, and from what sources

I spend a lot of time speaking with clients about the importance of optimising protein intake. We need protein to build and repair tissues such as bones, muscle and cartilage, to make enzymes and hormones, and it&rsquos also needed for healthy immune system function. Protein is key for runners, since muscles are largely made up of protein (actin and myosin), so including enough in your diet is vital for recovering from runs and building muscle to improve performance.


Here&rsquos how much protein you should be eating, and from what sources

I spend a lot of time speaking with clients about the importance of optimising protein intake. We need protein to build and repair tissues such as bones, muscle and cartilage, to make enzymes and hormones, and it&rsquos also needed for healthy immune system function. Protein is key for runners, since muscles are largely made up of protein (actin and myosin), so including enough in your diet is vital for recovering from runs and building muscle to improve performance.


Here&rsquos how much protein you should be eating, and from what sources

I spend a lot of time speaking with clients about the importance of optimising protein intake. We need protein to build and repair tissues such as bones, muscle and cartilage, to make enzymes and hormones, and it&rsquos also needed for healthy immune system function. Protein is key for runners, since muscles are largely made up of protein (actin and myosin), so including enough in your diet is vital for recovering from runs and building muscle to improve performance.


Here&rsquos how much protein you should be eating, and from what sources

I spend a lot of time speaking with clients about the importance of optimising protein intake. We need protein to build and repair tissues such as bones, muscle and cartilage, to make enzymes and hormones, and it&rsquos also needed for healthy immune system function. Protein is key for runners, since muscles are largely made up of protein (actin and myosin), so including enough in your diet is vital for recovering from runs and building muscle to improve performance.


Here&rsquos how much protein you should be eating, and from what sources

I spend a lot of time speaking with clients about the importance of optimising protein intake. We need protein to build and repair tissues such as bones, muscle and cartilage, to make enzymes and hormones, and it&rsquos also needed for healthy immune system function. Protein is key for runners, since muscles are largely made up of protein (actin and myosin), so including enough in your diet is vital for recovering from runs and building muscle to improve performance.


Here&rsquos how much protein you should be eating, and from what sources

I spend a lot of time speaking with clients about the importance of optimising protein intake. We need protein to build and repair tissues such as bones, muscle and cartilage, to make enzymes and hormones, and it&rsquos also needed for healthy immune system function. Protein is key for runners, since muscles are largely made up of protein (actin and myosin), so including enough in your diet is vital for recovering from runs and building muscle to improve performance.


Here&rsquos how much protein you should be eating, and from what sources

I spend a lot of time speaking with clients about the importance of optimising protein intake. We need protein to build and repair tissues such as bones, muscle and cartilage, to make enzymes and hormones, and it&rsquos also needed for healthy immune system function. Protein is key for runners, since muscles are largely made up of protein (actin and myosin), so including enough in your diet is vital for recovering from runs and building muscle to improve performance.


Here&rsquos how much protein you should be eating, and from what sources

I spend a lot of time speaking with clients about the importance of optimising protein intake. We need protein to build and repair tissues such as bones, muscle and cartilage, to make enzymes and hormones, and it&rsquos also needed for healthy immune system function. Protein is key for runners, since muscles are largely made up of protein (actin and myosin), so including enough in your diet is vital for recovering from runs and building muscle to improve performance.


Here&rsquos how much protein you should be eating, and from what sources

I spend a lot of time speaking with clients about the importance of optimising protein intake. We need protein to build and repair tissues such as bones, muscle and cartilage, to make enzymes and hormones, and it&rsquos also needed for healthy immune system function. Protein is key for runners, since muscles are largely made up of protein (actin and myosin), so including enough in your diet is vital for recovering from runs and building muscle to improve performance.


Here&rsquos how much protein you should be eating, and from what sources

I spend a lot of time speaking with clients about the importance of optimising protein intake. We need protein to build and repair tissues such as bones, muscle and cartilage, to make enzymes and hormones, and it&rsquos also needed for healthy immune system function. Protein is key for runners, since muscles are largely made up of protein (actin and myosin), so including enough in your diet is vital for recovering from runs and building muscle to improve performance.


Watch the video: Γιατί Να Είσαι Κρεατοφάγος, Βίγκαν, Χορτοφάγος, Φρουτοφάγος; (January 2022).