Other

Unapproved GMO Wheat Discovered in Oregon

Unapproved GMO Wheat Discovered in Oregon


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

Federal officials have found genetically modified wheat growing in a farm in Oregon

Furthering the debate on whether genetically modifying foods (or even experimenting) is a good idea, the Agriculture Department has announced that an unapproved genetically modified wheat variety has been found in a farm in Oregon.

The New York Times reports that it's unknown if any of the genetically modified wheat has gotten into the food supply, but officials claim there is no threat to health. The wheat was a type developed by Monsanto from 1998 to 2005 in Oregon, where wheat was engineered to be resistant to the herbicide Roundup. Monsanto dropped the project before it was approved for commercial use, The New York Times reports, but the FDA did review the wheat in 2004 and found no safety problems.

Unfortunately, the presence of GMO wheat could spark other countries to turn away or ban exports of American wheat, worth $8.1 billion in 2012. Almost half of the U.S. wheat crop heads abroad, and about 90 percent of Oregon's wheat crop is exported.

The wheat was discovered when a farmer tried to kill the crop, and a percentage of the crop failed to die; officials are now trying to see if more genetically engineered wheat is being grown elsewhere. Meanwhile, Monsanto claims in a statement that it is cooperating with the Agriculture Department, but is obviously downplaying the find. "There is considerable reason to believe that the presence of the Roundup Ready trait in wheat, if determined to be valid, is very limited," a press release said.


Atasteofcreole's Blog

Unapproved genetically engineered wheat has been discovered in an Oregon field, a potential threat to trade with countries that have concerns about genetically modified foods.

The Agriculture Department said Wednesday that the genetically engineered wheat is safe to eat and there is no evidence that modified wheat entered the marketplace. But the department is investigating how it ended up in the field, whether there was any criminal wrongdoing and whether its growth is widespread.

We are taking this very seriously,” said Michael Firko of the Agriculture Department’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.

A farmer discovered the genetically modified plants on his farm and contacted Oregon State University, which notified USDA early this month, Firko said.

No genetically engineered wheat has been approved for U.S. farming. USDA officials said the wheat is the same strain as a genetically modified wheat that was legally tested by seed giant Monsanto a decade ago but never approved. Monsanto stopped testing that product in Oregon and several other states in 2005.

The discovery could have far-reaching implications for the U.S. wheat industry if the growth of the engineered product turns out to be far-flung. Many countries around the world will not accept imports of genetically modified foods, and the United States exports about half of its wheat crop.

Oregon Department of Agriculture Director Katy Coba said in a statement that the discovery is “a very serious development that could have major trade ramifications.” The state exports about 90 percent of its wheat.

“I am concerned that a highly regulated plant material such as genetically modified wheat somehow was able to escape into a crop field,” she said.

USDA officials declined to speculate whether the modified seeds blew into the field from a testing site or if they were somehow planted or taken there, and they would not identify the farmer or the farm’s location. The Oregon Department of Agriculture said the field is in the eastern part of the state.

The discovery also could have implications for organic companies, which by law cannot use genetically engineered ingredients in its foods. Organic farmers have frequently expressed concern that genetically modified seed will blow into organic farms and contaminate their products.

U.S. consumers have shown increasing interest in avoiding genetically modified foods. There has been little evidence to show that modified foods are less safe than their conventional counterparts, but several state legislatures are considering bills that would require them to be labeled so consumers know what they are eating.

While most of the corn and soybeans grown in the United States are already modified, the country’s wheat crop is not.

USDA said the unidentified farmer discovered the modified wheat when farm workers were trying to kill some wheat plants that popped up between harvests. The farmer used the herbicide glyphosate to kill the plants, but they did not die, prompting the tests at Oregon State to find out if the crops were genetically engineered to resist herbicides.

The tests confirmed that the plants were a strain developed by Monsanto to resist its herbicides and tested between 1998 and 2005. At the time Monsanto had applied to USDA for permission to develop the engineered wheat, but the company later pulled its application.

The Agriculture Department said that during that seven-year period, it authorized more than 100 field tests with the same glyphosate-resistant wheat variety. Tests were conducted in in Arizona, California, Colorado, Florida, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Kansas, Minnesota, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, Oregon, South Dakota, Washington and Wyoming.

During that testing and application process, the Food and Drug Administration reviewed the variety found in Oregon and said it was as safe as conventional varieties of wheat.

Officials said they have received no other reports of discoveries of genetically modified wheat. Firko and Acting Deputy Secretary of Agriculture Michael T. Scuse said they have already been in touch with international trading partners to try and assuage any concerns.

Hopefully our trading partners will be understanding that this is not a food or feed safety issue,” Scuse said.


A Biscuit In The Sun

Everybody loves ‘Cyber Woman With Corn’

As horrifying as GMOs in the food supply are, this chilling discovery is not a business vs. ‘the hippies’ issue. If US wheat is found to contain GMOs current customers could turn their back on US suppliers in droves:

…the mere presence of the genetically modified plant could cause some countries to turn away exports of American wheat, especially if any traces of the unapproved grain were found in shipments. About $8.1 billion in American wheat was exported in 2012, representing nearly half the total $17.9 billion crop, according to U.S. Wheat Associates, which promotes American wheat abroad. About 90 percent of Oregon’s wheat crop is exported.

This is a problem even Monsanto recognizes. GMO corn & soybeans are consumed in the main by livestock. Wheat is ‘people-food,’ and people have thusfar been uncomfortable with eating GMO wheat.

No genetically engineered wheat has been approved in any country. Indeed, one reason Monsanto dropped its development of genetically modified wheat in 2004 was concern from American farmers that it would endanger wheat exports.

That means the rest of the world –everywhere that doesn’t have a private company serially mishandling GMOs in natural and farm ecosystems– will gladly step in to fill the newly-vacated hole in the ranks of world wheat exporters. Pretty soon it’s not just a ‘farm problem’ anymore, it’s an economic problem and a prestige problem that can spread to all US agricultural exports. Read the rest here, then consider making yourself heard in the current national debates over GMO crops in general and food labeling in particular.


Fallout Starts for Wheat Farmers after GMO Wheat Found in Oregon

Fallout for U.S. wheat exports has begun following the USDA&aposs announcement that unapproved GMO wheat had been discovered growing on a farm in Oregon, with Japan announcing that it will halt all Western wheat imports, and the EU strongly recommending that member states test wheat imports coming from the US.

The GMO wheat found in Oregon is the same strain that was part of a test batch grown by Monsanto between 1996 and 2004. No GMO wheat has been approved for sale in the US, and the question of how the wheat got into the field many years after the test sites were shut down is sounding alarm bells for many.

Japan, a major wheat importer from the US, canceled an order to buy US grain on hearing news of the discovery of the GMO wheat plants. "We will refrain from buying western white and feed wheat effective today," Toru Hisadome, a Japanese farm ministry official in charge of wheat trading, told Reuters.

Other major Asian customers for US wheat, including South Korea, China, and the Philippines expressed concern and said they were monitoring the situation. Asia importsꁀ million tons of wheat per year, and the US is their No. 1 supplier, but most of these countries do not allow GMO grains for human consumption.

On the heels of the announcement from Japan, the European Union issued a statement urging its 27 member states to test incoming shipments of US wheat for GMOs.


NON-GMO PROJECT RESPONDS TO GMO WHEAT CONTAMINATION IN WASHINGTON

Bellingham, WA, June 19, 2019 —The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) announced last week that an unapproved variety of genetically engineered glyphosate-resistant wheat was found in an unplanted farm in Washington state. This experimental variety was reportedly grown in field trials more than a decade ago. There are no genetically engineered wheat varieties currently approved for sale in the United States or any other country, and yet biotechnology companies continue to allow their GMOs to contaminate fallow fields.

This is not the first time wheat has been contaminated by an unapproved GMO. Glyphosate-tolerant wheat was discovered in Oregon in 2013, Montana in 2014, Washington in 2016, and Alberta, Canada in 2018. The USDA strengthened its oversight of wheat field trials after the 2016 contamination producers are now required to obtain permits for such trials.

This occurrence threatens the U.S. wheat market. International regulations on import and sale of unapproved GMO varieties are strict previous contamination events have led to rejection by foreign markets The Washington Association of Wheat Growers reports that Washington state exports 80 to 90 percent of its wheat crop, which means farmers may face low prices if foreign markets reject American or Washington-grown wheat.

“This contamination demonstrates yet again that once GMOs are released into the environment, these novel organisms cannot be recalled,” says Non-GMO Project Executive Director Megan Westgate. “The Non-GMO Project remains committed to protecting our supply chain from unchecked GMO contamination.”

About the Non-GMO Project

The Non-GMO Project is a nonprofit organization committed to preserving and building sources of non-GMO products, educating consumers, and providing verified non-GMO choices.


Monsanto's Unapproved GMO Wheat Found Growing in Washington State

Monsanto's experimental genetically engineered wheat has been found growing in a field in Washington state, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) confirmed last week.

This discovery not only raises concerns over GMO contamination, it could be another legal headache for Monsanto, as the agritech giant has paid millions to settle recent lawsuits over illegal GMO wheat.

GMO wheat is not allowed to be grown anywhere in the world. Monsanto has had to pay millions to settle lawsuits over GMO wheat scares in Oregon. Flickr

Reuters reported on Friday that a farmer found 22 unapproved GMO wheat plants in a field that has not been planted since 2015. Federal and state officials are now conducting an investigation.

According to the Associated Press, "Federal officials said they were working with the farmer to ensure that none of the modified wheat is sold. Out of caution, the agency said it is holding and testing the farmer's full wheat harvest, but so far it has not found GMOs."

The GMO wheat, or MON 71700, is resistant to the herbicide glyphosate, the active ingredient in Monsanto's flagship weedkiller Roundup. The USDA found no evidence of the wheat in commerce and the Food and Drug Administration concluded that the wheat poses no threat if it turned up in our food supply.

Monsanto said in a statement to the AP that the wheat plants were used in field trials in the Pacific Northwest from 1998 to 2001 but never commercialized. It is currently unclear how the plants got to the field in Washington State.

Safe or not, GMO wheat is not allowed for commercial use or production in the U.S. or anywhere in the world for that matter. And yet this is the third such discovery of Monsanto's rogue GMO wheat in the U.S. in the last three consecutive years.

As the AP pointed out, unapproved GMO wheat was found at a university research center in Huntley, Montana in 2014 where it was legally tested by Monsanto in the early 2000s. In 2013, another unapproved strain of Monsanto's GMO wheat was found on an eastern Oregon farm even though there had been no tests in the area. To this day it is unclear how the wheat got there.

As EcoWatch noted back in 2013, because pollen naturally blows or migrates to neighboring fields, contamination of farmers' fields is both predictable and unavoidable. Additionally, many farmers incur considerable costs in testing their crops and seed supply for transgenic contamination or actually forgo planting of certain crops in order to maintain seed purity.

GMO wheat contamination is somewhat of a sore subject for Monsanto. In 2014, the agritech giant paid $2.4 million to settle a lawsuit filed by U.S. wheat farmers over the GMO wheat scare in Oregon. Last year, the company paid another $350,000 to farmers in seven states over the same issue.

Monsanto told the AP that the type of GMO wheat found in Washington state is similar to the one discovered in Oregon in 2013.

The latest discovery of GMO wheat could also impact global trade, as many countries have strict regulations over GMOs and GMO imports.


Unapproved Genetically Modified Wheat Found In US — Again

Previous GM wheat cases include 22 stalks also found in Washington State in 2016, and in eastern Oregon in 2013. A third case from 2014 involved a research farm at Huntley, Montana, where GMO wheat had been tested from 2002-2003. GM wheat has also been found in Alberta, Canada.

The USDA never approved the growth of genetically modified (GM) wheat. So why does it keep popping up?

A wheat strain resistant to the weedkiller glyphosate – more commonly known as Roundup – was found growing wild in the northwestern United States for the fourth time since 2013.

This time, the plants were discovered in a fallow field in Washington state. They raise questions about U.S. biotech and its effects on the environment outside the laboratory, and in particular, field trials of Roundup-tolerant GM wheat conducted by Monsanto in the Pacific Northwest from 1999-2001.

Monsanto is now owned by Bayer. That merger created the largest crop supply company in the world.

The previous cases include 22 stalks of GM wheat also found in Washington State in 2016, and in eastern Oregon in 2013. The USDA never found the source of those stalks. A third case from 2014 involved a research farm at Huntley, Montana, where GM wheat had been tested from 2002-2003. GM wheat has also been found in Alberta, Canada.

Washington State is the fourth-largest wheat-producing state in the nation, with between 80 and 90 percent of crops exported to Pacific Rim countries.

Japan and South Korea suspended purchases in 2016 after the previous case of rogue GMO wheat from Washington State.

There is no evidence the wheat has entered the food chain, said the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS), on Friday to FERN.


Why would foreign markets reject Round-Up Ready Wheat?

Round-up’s primary ingredient, glyphosate, has been classified as a “probable carcinogen” by the World Health Organization. In fact, last month a California jury awarded more than $2 billion to a couple that argued Round-up caused their non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma.

While the US’s federal government has dragged it’s feet on any GMO bans, 39 other countries ban the cultivation of GMO crops, including 28 European Countries, Algeria and Madagascar in Africa Turkey, Kyrgyzstan, Bhutan, and Saudi Arabia in Asia Belize, Peru, Ecuador, and Venezuela in South America and all of Russia. Meanwhile, as many as 60 other countries restrict the import of GMO crops or have some sort of partial ban on GMOs.


Support climate news that matters

Grist is a nonprofit, independent, media organization dedicated to telling stories of climate, justice, and solutions. We aim to inspire more people to talk about climate change and to believe that meaningful change is not only possible but happening right now. The more we celebrate progress, the more progress we can make. This approach to solutions-based journalism depends on the support of our readers. Please join us by donating today to ensure this important work continues and thrives.

All donations made between now and May 31 will be matched.


Nonapproved strain of genetically modified wheat discovered in Oregon

WASHINGTON Unapproved genetically engineered wheat has been discovered in an Oregon field, a potential threat to trade with countries that have concerns about genetically modified foods.

USDA officials said the wheat is the same strain as a genetically modified wheat that was tested by seed giant Monsanto (MON) a decade ago but never approved. Monsanto stopped testing that product in Oregon and several other states in 2005.

The Agriculture Department said Wednesday that the genetically engineered wheat is safe to eat and there is no evidence that modified wheat entered the marketplace. But the department is investigating how it ended up in the field, whether there was any criminal wrongdoing and whether its growth is widespread.

"We are taking this very seriously,'' said Michael Firko of the Agriculture Department's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.

A farmer discovered the genetically modified plants on his farm and contacted Oregon State University, which notified USDA early this month, Firko said.

No genetically engineered wheat has been approved for U.S. farming. USDA officials said the wheat is the same strain as a genetically modified wheat that was legally tested by seed giant Monsanto a decade ago but never approved. Monsanto stopped testing that product in Oregon and several other states in 2005.

The discovery could have far-reaching implications for the U.S. wheat industry if the growth of the engineered product turns out to be far-flung. Many countries around the world will not accept imports of genetically modified foods, and the United States exports about half of its wheat crop.

Trending News

Oregon Department of Agriculture Director Katy Coba said in a statement that the discovery is "a very serious development that could have major trade ramifications.'' The state exports about 90 percent of its wheat.

"I am concerned that a highly regulated plant material such as genetically modified wheat somehow was able to escape into a crop field,'' she said.

USDA officials declined to speculate whether the modified seeds blew into the field from a testing site or if they were somehow planted or taken there, and they would not identify the farmer or the farm's location. The Oregon Department of Agriculture said the field is in the eastern part of the state.

The discovery also could have implications for organic companies, which by law cannot use genetically engineered ingredients in its foods. Organic farmers have frequently expressed concern that genetically modified seed will blow into organic farms and contaminate their products.

U.S. consumers have shown increasing interest in avoiding genetically modified foods. There has been little evidence to show that modified foods are less safe than their conventional counterparts, but several state legislatures are considering bills that would require them to be labeled so consumers know what they are eating.

While most of the corn and soybeans grown in the United States are already modified, the country's wheat crop is not.

The USDA said the unidentified farmer discovered the modified wheat when farm workers were trying to kill some wheat plants that popped up between harvests. The farmer used the herbicide glyphosate to kill the plants, but they did not die, prompting the tests at Oregon State to find out if the crops were genetically engineered to resist herbicides.

The tests confirmed that the plants were a strain developed by Monsanto to resist its herbicides and tested between 1998 and 2005. At the time, Monsanto had applied to the USDA for permission to develop the engineered wheat, but the company later pulled its application.

The Agriculture Department said that during that seven-year period, it authorized more than 100 field tests with the same glyphosate-resistant wheat variety. Tests were conducted in in Arizona, California, Colorado, Florida, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Kansas, Minnesota, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, Oregon, South Dakota, Washington and Wyoming.

During that testing and application process, the Food and Drug Administration reviewed the variety found in Oregon and said it was as safe as conventional varieties of wheat.

Officials said they have received no other reports of discoveries of genetically modified wheat. Firko and Acting Deputy Secretary of Agriculture Michael T. Scuse said they have already been in touch with international trading partners to try and assuage any concerns.

"Hopefully, our trading partners will be understanding that this is not a food or feed safety issue,'' Scuse said.

First published on May 29, 2013 / 5:36 PM

© 2013 The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.



Comments:

  1. Mahdi

    This is no longer an exception.

  2. Kagajas

    It's a pity that I can't speak right now - I'm very busy. I will be released - I will definitely express my opinion.

  3. Kajishakar

    Exactly! Excellent idea, I maintain.

  4. Barg

    I congratulate, excellent idea and it is duly



Write a message